Welcome to Papercut, glad you found us!
Based in the Sweden, we ship worldwide.
So let’s get off to a good start:

Go ahead!
Handpicked books, magazines, films and details
Choose currency
Menu
Search

Little White Lies, #81 – The Judy Issue

135 SEK
In stock for immediate delivery
SWEDEN SHIPPING Shipping Class 1 = 40 SEK
Shipping Class 2 = 60 SEK
Shipping Class 3 = 90 SEK EUROPE SHIPPING Shipping Class 1 = 100 SEK (approx 10 EUR)
Shipping Class 2 = 150 SEK (approx 15 EUR)
Shipping Class 3 = 200 SEK (approx 20 EUR) OUTSIDE EUROPE SHIPPING Shipping Class 1 = 150 SEK (approx 15 USD)
Shipping Class 2 = 200 SEK (approx 20 USD)
Shipping Class 3 = 300 SEK (approx 30 USD)

NOTE: You can buy as many items you want within the same shipping class. Read more » ×

Eschewing hype, gossip and meaningless celebrity, Little White Lies is a bi-monthly magazine that engages with movie lovers who understand that cinema is about broadening your horizons. It’s a tangible representation of the conversation about films that you wished you had. It’s a magazine about truth and movies.

In This Issue:

Our latest issue pays tribute to an icon of Hollywood, as played by Renée Zellweger in Rupert Goold’s beautiful new biopic.

I’ll be deadly honest with you: if you told me a year ago that we’d be putting out an issue of Little White Lies with Renée Zellweger on the cover and celebrating a brand new music biopic, I’d look at you with a quizzical eye and chuckle nervously. We often hear people say things like, “it’s a Little White Lies movie”, which usually translates that it’s got a indie flavour, slightly left field subject matter, visually very stylish.

It’s a very certain type of film. But the view from the inside is that all movies are Little White Lies movies, or at least have the potential to be. Is there anything more amazing than the feeling of going to see a film for which your expectations are somewhat muted, and then being completely swept off your feet by it? You’re just left there, gawping at the screen and hoping your seat neighbours don’t spot the tear tramlines when the lights go up.

This is exactly what happened to me at a screening of Rupert Goold’s Judy, the story of Judy Garland’s haphazard residency at London’s Talk of the Town at the tail end of 1968 and through to 1969 – the year that would end up being her last. In the lead role is Renée Zellweger, taking up the task of representing a real celebrity – one of the most beloved of the modern age, no less – and making her Hollywood colleagues look like rank amateurs. Hers is not a performance powered by affectation and conspicuous showboating, but one which is blessed with the weight of history and an understanding of deep sorrow. When a film feels right, then it’s right. And Judy feels right for this moment, and out 81st cover film.

Close

Sign up for our weekly newsletter and we will keep you updated with inspiration, news and exclusive offers.

This site uses cookies (cookies) to ensure the best user experience. If you continue to use the site, you accept the use of cookies. Read more »

Ok